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Chevron finds gas at Kentish Knock South-1 well

13 February 2013

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Chevron's Australian affiliate has discovered natural gas at the Kentish Knock South-1 exploration discovery well, located in the Carnarvon Basin, offshore Australia.

During drilling, the well encountered about 246ft (75m) of net gas pay in the upper Mungaroo Sands.

Chevron drilled the well in 3,832ft (1,168m) of water to a total depth of 10,056ft (3,065m).

The well is located in the WA-365-P permit area, about 173 miles (280km) north of Exmouth off the Western Australian coast.

Chevron Corporation vice chairman George Kirkland said: "The Asia Pacific region is key to Chevron's growth strategy and our strong Australia natural gas portfolio continues to be bolstered by our strategic approach to finding and developing resources that will help meet the growing energy needs in the region."

"The well is located in the WA-365-P permit area, about 173 miles (280km) north of Exmouth off the Western Australian coast."

Chevron Asia Pacific Exploration and Production Company president Melody Meyer said: "Kentish Knock South-1 is an important addition to our queue of high-quality offshore natural gas opportunities in Australia and further supports our long-term plans to expand our Australian LNG position."

Carnarvon Basin's onshore part covers about 115,000km², while the offshore part covers about 535,000km² with water depths reaching up to 3,500m.

The basin is separated into two major areas - the Northern Carnarvon Basin and the Southern Carnarvon Basin.

The Northern Carnarvon Basin comprises of the Exmouth Plateau, Wombat Plateau, Investigator Sub-basin, Rankin Platform, Exmouth Sub-basin, Barrow Sub-basin, Dampier Sub-basin, Beagle Sub-basin, Enderby Terrace, Peedamullah Shelf and the Lambert Shelf.

The Southern basin includes the Gascoyne, Merlinleigh, Bidgemia and Byro Sub-basins and Bernier Platform.


Image: The well encountered about 246ft (75m) of net gas pay in the upper Mungaroo Sands. Photo courtesy of Simon Johnston.

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