Airborne Technology Used in Gulf Slick Clean-Up

11 May 2010 (Last Updated May 11th, 2010 18:30)

Air-borne mapping and measuring technologies are playing a large part in the response to Deepwater Horizon's sinking and subsequent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Texas-based TTI Exploration and Florida-based Galileo Group have aeroplanes monitoring and measuring the effects of the oi

Air-borne mapping and measuring technologies are playing a large part in the response to Deepwater Horizon's sinking and subsequent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

Texas-based TTI Exploration and Florida-based Galileo Group have aeroplanes monitoring and measuring the effects of the oil spill as BP and Transocean work to contain the leak.

TTI's Natural Resource Mapping (NRM) and Galileo's Hyperspectral Imaging Data (HID) will focus on the effects of the oil on water quality and habitat pollution in the fragile ecosystems on the coast of the US.

The NRM system captures high-resolution geographical measurements of rock and fluid properties, above and below the surface of the water.

The data collected is then interpreted by TTI to produce an accurate analysis of how the oil is affecting the environment.

HID uses colours to identify anomalies, normally invisible to the human eye, because all substances give off a unique spectrum.

TTI president and CEO Jim Hollis said the technology is well suited to delivering a single dataset of the oil spill's affects for governmenta and private and non-profit organisations working on the oil clean-up.