offshore

Environmental organisation Greenpeace said Rosneft and ExxonMobil are exploring in the offshore Arctic and the Russian Coast Guard has threatened to fire on one of its ships, which was trying to expose them.

According to Greenpeace, Rosneft and ExxonMobil are operating in the frigid waters of the Kara Sea, north of Russia.

The organisation said chances of an oil spill are high in the region and as cleanup is virtually impossible, it may pose a serious threat to the Arctic nature and ecosystem.

Greenpeace’s ship Arctic Sunrise identified Akademik Lazarev, a seismic vessel hired by Rosneft, which was mapping out oil reservoirs under the seabed by firing acoustic cannons.

The sound from the cannons was greater than 250 decibels, which can severely damage the hearing of whales and dolphins.

"According to Greenpeace, Rosneft and ExxonMobil are operating in the frigid waters of the Kara Sea, north of Russia."

Greenpeace said that when the ship tried to enter the Kara Sea, which forms part of the Northern Sea Route, Russian authorities boarded Arctic Sunrise and denied the right to entry on three occasions.

The organisation alleged the denial of entry was a clear attempt by Russian authorities to stop it from exposing the truth of what the oil industry is doing in the Kara Sea.

Greenpeace claimed The Russian Government has invited Exxon, Shell, Statoil, Eni and BP to join forces with Rosneft and Gazprom to enter the Arctic.

Russia is planning to generate a $2.1 trillion economy that is reliant on exports of energy resources by exploring the Arctic’s oil and gas.


Image: Greenpeace protest in the Arctic. Photo courtesy of Greenpeace.

Nri