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BP Trinidad & Tobago (bpTT), a wholly-owned subsidiary of BP, has discovered an estimated one trillion cubic feet of gas in the Savonette 4 appraisal well, offshore of Trinidad.

The details of the discovery were announced during a meeting in London between the Minister of Energy and Energy Affairs Kevin Ramnarine, Trinidad and Tobago’s High Commissioner to London Garvin Nicholas and BP’s representatives.

BP Trinidad & Tobago president Norman Christie said the latest gas discovery is the largest for the company since 2005.

Savonette 4, located at water depths of almost 300 feet in the Columbus basin, is about 80km off the south-east coast of Trinidad.

BPTT drilled the appraisal well to a total depth of 18,678ft into an untested fault block east of the original Savonette field discovery well.

The drilling penetrated hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs in two intervals with gas discovered beyond the initial estimates.

"The significant investment in the Savonette 4 well and the potential further investment in two additional development wells, combined with the investment in the ocean bottom cable seismic acquisition, is testament to bpTT’s ongoing commitment to the development of our Trinidad and Tobago operations and the wider industry," Christie added.

Prompted by the new gas discovery, bpTT is now exploring and hoping to drill two more development wells in the Savonette reservoirs.

If the proposed drilling becomes successful, the wells will be brought into production during the next one year to 18 months, the company said.

The field, which was discovered by the Chachalaca exploration well in 2004, commenced production in 2009 with a normally unmanned platform built in Trinidad at TOFCO.

Savonette 4, in which BP has a 100% working interest, is currently flowing at about 225 million standard cubic feet of gas a day (mmscf/d) and the new discovery is likely to double the total production from the field to 2tcf.


Image: Trinidad and Tobago form an archipelagic state in the Southern Carribean. Photo courtesy of CIA World Factbook.