Maloin

US-based multinational energy firm Chevron said it has carried out a production test at the St. Malo PS003 well in the Lower Tertiary trend in deepwater in the Gulf of Mexico.

During the test, oil flow rates at the well exceeded 13,000 barrels per day, though were restricted by testing equipment constraints.

The company conducted the test during August and September 2012 in Walker Ridge Block 678, to target Lower Tertiary sands more than 20,000 feet (6,096 m) under the sea floor.

Walker Ridge Block 678 is the first development well in the St. Malo field, which is being jointly developed with the Jack field. Both fields are located within 25 miles (40km) of each other.

Chevron North America Exploration and Production Company president Gary Luquette said the results of the production test proves the importance of St. Malo field.

"During the test, oil flow rates at the well exceeded 13,000 barrels per day, though were restricted by testing equipment constraints."

"The jointly developed Jack and St. Malo fields are expected to provide a major step-up in Chevron’s production from 2014 and produce domestic energy for decades to come," Luquette added.

Chevron is developing the fields by deploying a host floating production unit, which is located between the two fields in 7,000 feet (2,134m) of water, about 280 miles (450km) south of New Orleans, Louisiana.

The facility will have a capacity of 177,000 barrels of oil-equivalent per day to hold production from the Jack / St. Malo development, as well as additional output from third-party tiebacks.

The Jack / St. Malo development is expected to produce at a maximum total daily rate of 94,000 barrels of oil-equivalent.

Chevron, which will spend nearly $7.5bn for the initial phase of the development, has a 51% working interest in the St. Malo field.

Other participating companies include Petrobras and Statoil, with 25% and 21.5% interest respectively, while ExxonMobil and Eni hold a stake of 1.25% each.


Image: Chevron’s Jack / St. Malo development is about 280 miles south of New Orleans, Louisiana. Photo courtesy of Chevron Corporation.

Energy