YPF has been granted a patent for a method and device that uses low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) to detect solid organic matter and fluids in shale rock samples. The method involves applying a 2D NMR assay with specific pulse sequences and obtaining a 2D T1-T2 map to determine relaxation times and quantify the amount of 1H nuclei. This technique can be used for analyzing rock samples from unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs. GlobalData’s report on YPF gives a 360-degree view of the company including its patenting strategy. Buy the report here.

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According to GlobalData’s company profile on YPF, it's grant share as of June 2023 was 1%. Grant share is based on the ratio of number of grants to total number of patents.

Method for detecting solid organic matter and fluids in rock samples using low field nmr

Source: United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). Credit: YPF SA

A recently granted patent (Publication Number: US11668664B2) describes a method and device for detecting solid organic matter and fluids in geological formation samples using low field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) technology. The method involves several steps, including providing a rock sample, conducting a 2D NMR assay, obtaining a 2D T1-T2 map, determining relaxation times, and assigning solid organic matter and fluid contributions based on these relaxation times. The amount of 1H nuclei in predefined regions of the map is quantified using a pre-calibration of the equipment response.

The patent claims also cover various aspects of the method, such as obtaining the 2D T1-T2 map using a numerical inversion algorithm, selecting different types of rock samples, applying dipolar refocusing pulse sequences, and assigning different relaxation times for fluids. The method can be carried out using NMR equipment with magnetic field strengths ranging from 1.5 MHz to 60 MHz.

Additionally, the patent describes the use of a receiver dead time shorter than 50 µs and active resonant circuit Q-factor modulation, as well as variable data acquisition time and programmable digital or analog filters. The method can also be used to characterize the total organic content of the sample and includes additional steps for acquiring decay measurements.

The patent also includes a device for detecting solid organic matter and fluids in shale rock. The device consists of an NMR equipment configured to perform the 2D NMR assay and obtain the 2D T1-T2 map, as well as processing means to analyze the data and assign solid and fluid contributions based on relaxation times. The NMR equipment can be a laboratory instrument or a well-logging tool, and it has a receiver dead time shorter than 50 µs with active resonant circuit Q-factor modulation.

Overall, this patent presents a method and device for efficiently detecting solid organic matter and fluids in geological formation samples using low field NMR technology. The method allows for the quantification and characterization of these components, which can be valuable in various industries such as oil and gas exploration and environmental monitoring.

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GlobalData’s Patent Analytics tracks patent filings and grants from official offices around the world. Textual analysis and official patent classifications are used to group patents into key thematic areas and link them to specific companies across the world’s largest industries.