Chevron‘s $5.1bn Big Foot project has faced another blow after another three tendons sank to the ocean floor.

The company announced on 1 June that six of the 16 tendons had sunk.

On 1 June, Chevron announced plans to shift its deepwater Big Foot tension-leg platform (TLP) from its existing location in the US Gulf of Mexico to more sheltered waters following a damage caused to subsea installation tendons.

The tendons sinking could delay the project further and also cut the company’s production by less than 25,000 barrels a day in 2017.

"Chevron could be forced to indefinitely delay the planned start of crude production in 2015 from the 200 million-barrel field."

Chevron spokesman Kurt Glaubitz told Bloomberg Television that the company is the process of determining the causes for the damage and is not sure about when repairs will start or finish.

After the incident, Chevron could be forced to indefinitely delay the planned start of crude production in 2015 from the 200 million-barrel field.

Around 40 workers are managing the investigation and four remotely operated underwater vehicles have been deployed by the company to examine the tendons that sank.

Chevron is also working with the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement and the US Coast Guard in this regard.

The company previously said that the Big Foot TLP was not connected to any subsea wells or tendons at the time when the accident took place and escaped any damage.

The incident did not cause any injuries and released no fluids.