Technip to provide intervention services for Statoil’s subsea compression stations

12 February 2014 (Last Updated February 12th, 2014 18:30)

Technip has received a substantial contract ranging from €100m to €250m from Statoil for future intervention services on the Asgard subsea compression stations.

Technip

Technip has received a substantial contract ranging from €100m to €250m from Statoil for future intervention services on the Asgard subsea compression stations.

The Asgard field lies on the Halten Bank in the Norwegian Sea, approximately 200km off Norway.

Under the contract, which will be managed by Technip's operating centre in Stavanger, Norway, the company will extend the dedicated vessel and equipment, developed under the current Asgard subsea compression marine operations contract.

The contract will also cover the use of the vessel for other inspection, maintenance and repair (IMR) and construction work, whether for the Asgard field or for other licences in Statoil's Norwegian continental shelf portfolio.

The contract will commence in 2015, after the completion of the initial installation of the subsea compression modules, and will be carried out in mid-2018.

According to Technip, the North Sea giant construction vessel will be committed to Statoil on a full-time charter and will come complete with onboard special handling system (SHS).

SHS is a purpose-built system for installation and recovery of heavy subsea compression modules in adverse sea states.

"The Asgard field lies on the Halten Bank in the Norwegian Sea, approximately 200km off Norway."

The IMR vessel including the 400T SHS has been developed following various engineering, analysis, simulation and model tests.

Technip Norway managing director Odd Strømsnes said: "The Asgard subsea compression project is one of the key subsea technology projects currently undertaken in the North Sea-Canada region.

"This award strategically positions us to meet future industry requirements for heavy IMR related work, requiring the ability to handle heavier loads in harsh environments."

The compression process will use new technology and enable the gas to gain sufficient additional pressure for it to be transported through the pipeline to the platform.


Image: Technip head office in Paris. Photo: courtesy of Technip.

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