Wearable technology keeps offshore workers informed 

6 June 2018 (Last Updated June 6th, 2018 11:36)

In collaboration with oil and gas company Lundin Norway, software provider Eigen has designed an app which pairs with wearable devices to provide oil and gas offshore workers with real-time information.

Wearable technology keeps offshore workers informed 
Software provider Eigen has designed an app to provide offshore workers with real-time information Credit: Eigen

In collaboration with oil and gas company Lundin Norway, software provider Eigen has designed an app which pairs with wearable devices to provide oil and gas offshore workers with real-time information.

Using the tool, offshore ‘digital’ workers are given instant access to operational data through the app itself or a headset with a visor interface. Information about industrial equipment can be accessed either through image processing or by manually entering search terms, offering data on past or planned maintenance, recently generated alarms, live performance data and documentation.

The app is intended to increase worker efficiency as it eliminates the time spent understanding the status of equipment, allowing engineers to focus on the tasks before them. Additionally, by giving workers access to information about the facilities, they are more readily alerted to any potential dangers.

Eigen CEO Murray Callander said the app is a ‘prime example’ of the evolution of operational capability enabled with Industry 4.0 technologies.

Eigen’s platform, Ingenuity, was used to design the technology. The platform is a smart layer which provides contextual linking on top of existing systems, collecting data from different sources and pooling it into a single portal to enable search and aggregation.

Ingenuity was specifically adapted in the project to work on Android-based wearables.

The app is due to go into full production from this month and will be available on the App Store, following its brief trial period on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

Currently, the offshore industry is facing two main types of workspace digitalisation: digital decision and digital execution. While the former uses data to coordinate and control work, the latter embeds information processing to change the ways work is performed.

Wearable technology is a prime physical example of such an approach, demonstrating how seemingly minor technologies can impact daily tasks, decision-making and, therefore, profits.

In March of this year, Eigen chief strategy officer Gareth Davies wrote for ITProPortal that digital execution in particular is gaining traction in the oil and gas industry, as many see it as holding promise for improving productivity.

Davies said Eigen’s approach to digitalisation is to, “leverage the information that is already available”,  enabling engineers to create “instinctive workflows that speed their work”.